Past Workshop

Developing Metacognitive Skills Through Reflective Journaling in Science and Math Classes

Leaders: Kelly O’Shea and Chris Vicevich We want our students to do more than just apply a set of procedures. How do they develop the skills to be able to identify and solve new problems? Journal writing can help. Writing about one’s process makes reflection an explicit activity, gives students a chance to revisit a

“Whiteboard as a Verb” and “Expanding Your Resource Bank”

Leader: Patricia Bauer (Marymount School) Part 1: Whiteboard as a Verb: Whether you are a modeler or not, the benefits of whiteboarding are multitudinous.

Chemistry—A Modeling Approach to Periodicity & Bonding

Leaders: Donghong Sun, Tammy Gwara The periodicity of elements and chemical bonding are essential topics in introductory chemistry. However, when we teach these topics, we frequently rely on anthropomorphizing the particles in order to help students remember: “Sodium wants to lose this extra electron because it’s happier with a full valence.” Students memorize the conventions

Writing Practice Exam Questions for Physics AP1

Leaders: Jesus Hernandez (Manhattan Center for Science and Math) Zhanna Glazenburg (Croton-Harmon High School) Participants in this workshop will consider how the redesigned Physics AP1 expectations differ from AP Physics B and how that affects the practice questions we use in our classes to help students meet the new expectations.

Particle Models of Matter for Middle School Science/Meteorology

Leader: Mark Schober Mr. Schober will share a sequence of demos and student activities that induce students to develop a particle model of matter to help them understand meteorological concepts, including wind, air pressure, humidity, and phase changes.

EXPERIMENTS FIRST! – COLLECT DATA, PLOT GRAPHS TO ANALYZE, & DEVELOP EQUATIONS FOR PATTERNS

Leaders: Zhanna Glazenburg and Seth Guinals-Kupperman Participants will explore a variety of experimental situations in various contexts, (biology, chemistry, physics, physical science, . . . ) collect data, plot graphs to analyze the data, and develop an equation for representing the pattern in the data.